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Stephanie Foster

Stephenie-FosterWith over 25 years of experience in domestic and international policy Stephenie’s consulting practice advises clients on issues ranging from public/private partnerships, global networking, political strategy and lobbying. Her international work has taken her to more than 20 countries.  Previously she served as Chief of Staff to two United States Senators (Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) and Christopher Dodd (D-CT)), held senior positions at Legacy and Planned Parenthood and was appointed by President Clinton as General Counsel for the U.S. General Services Administration. Stephenie was a former law partner in California and is currently a Professorial Lecturer at American University. She is an author and blogger and you can follow her work at www.baronessgoudie.com, www.stephenieFoster.com, www.connectusfund.com and @StephanieFoster

 

 

Charlotte Black  Charlotte Black

Charlotte works for Conde Nast International as its Talent Brand Manager. She is a communications expert with strong digital and media knowledge and has extensive experience in developing global reputation management campaigns.

In her spare time Charlotte is a mentor for the human trafficking charity, HERA and is also involved in the 30% Club, a UK based cross business initiative originally aimed at 30% women on UK corporate boards by 2015. Follow Charlotte on twitter @cb_london

 

Women, Peace and Security – UN Security Council Resolution 1325

Women, Peace and Security 

 

UN Security Council Resolution 1325 was the first of its kind to specifically address the unique impact of conflict on women, and women’s important contributions to conflict resolution and sustainable peace. Passed in 2000, it marked a watershed moment when the international community formally recognized the integral role of women and gender to peace and security. UNSCR 1325 has remained an essential tool for encouraging governments to fulfill their obligations to ensure women are included as agents for peace and security in all processes, and its framework has inspired further action by the UN and civil societies and governments around the world to mainstream gender into their work on conflict resolution.

 

Following UNSCR 1325, subsequent Security Council Resolutions further defined the importance of women’s roles in conflict and peacebuilding. Resolutions 1820, passed in 2008, and 1888, passed in 2009,  recognize sexual violence as an issue of international peace and security and reiterate the need for a comprehensive response to sexual and gender-based violence. In 2010, Resolution 1960 created specific steps needed for the prevention of sexual violence, and Resolution 2106 in 2013 looked specifically at accountability for crimes of sexual violence. The most recent resolution on women, peace and security, UNSCR 2122, aims to strengthen measures to improve the participation of women in all phases of conflict resolution and prevention.

 

UNSCR 1325 and successive Resolutions are an important show of international support that ensure women, peace and security are on the agenda for international organizations and governments across the globe, but there are many steps between the passage of such resolutions and their full implementation on the ground.  One tool that helps bridge this gap are National Action Plans(NAPs), written plans that specify how a country will mainstream gender, and the principles of 1325 into its defense, development and diplomatic activities. Over 36 countries in the world have drafted NAPs, and that number is growing every year.

 

In addition to government- and UN-level documents and programs, it is important to consider the work women do in more informal, Track II diplomatic and peace negotiations. Around the world, women are active as civil society leaders, and in many cases, such as Liberia, Northern Ireland and the Philippines, their grassroots work has played a major role in peace processes.

 

For more resources on women, peace and security, visit The Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and SecurityPeaceWomenUSIP, and The Institute for Inclusive Security.

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