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Archive | July, 2011

Bonded Labour in South Asia

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

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A BLOG POST BY SIDDHARTH KARA A bonded labourer named Sanjay in Bihar, India, once described to me how he took a loan of approximately $44 from the local landowner to provide medicines to his ailing father. Nine years later, Sanjay told me, “The landowner sent us for work at his brick kiln to repay [...]

Human Trafficking Screening in New York – July 28th

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

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Human Trafficking Screening in New York – July 28th

A BLOG POST BY ANALENA ALCABES, ALLISON GROSSMAN AND KATHLEEN BRAINE, NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR WOMEN The New York City chapter of the National Organization for Women and the Athena Center of Barnard College are hosting a free movie screening and panel discussion on the subject of human trafficking on Thursday, July 28th, starting at 6:30. [...]

An Egyptian Man’s View of Sexual Harassment Past and Present

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

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An Egyptian Man’s View of Sexual Harassment Past and Present

A BLOG POST BY AHMED KAMEL The euphoria accompanying the success of Egypt’s January 25th revolution was sullied by two high profile sexual harassment incidents of women. These examples could open the door to address this ugly and violent crime in Egypt. The first occurred on the day President Mubarak announced his resignation, February 11, [...]

Trafficking in Persons Report Enters Second Decade

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

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Trafficking in Persons Report Enters Second Decade

A BLOG POST BY STEPHENIE FOSTER Last week, the US State Department released the 2011 Trafficking in Persons (TIP) report. It’s a weighty document (literally) which sets out the progress, and lack thereof, that countries across the globe have made in combatting human trafficking.   The 412 pages are sobering, and give you a sense of [...]

Industry Leaders Endorse Growth Through Diversity

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

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A BLOG POST BY BARONESS GOUDIE The inaugural 30% “Action Beyond Words” seminar promotes the next steps to get more women on boards Tuesday 5th July, London – Last night saw the inaugural 30% Club “Actions Beyond Words” seminar held at London’s CASS Business School. The event, where speakers included the Home Secretary – the [...]

Women, Peace and Security – UN Security Council Resolution 1325

Women, Peace and Security 

 

UN Security Council Resolution 1325 was the first of its kind to specifically address the unique impact of conflict on women, and women’s important contributions to conflict resolution and sustainable peace. Passed in 2000, it marked a watershed moment when the international community formally recognized the integral role of women and gender to peace and security. UNSCR 1325 has remained an essential tool for encouraging governments to fulfill their obligations to ensure women are included as agents for peace and security in all processes, and its framework has inspired further action by the UN and civil societies and governments around the world to mainstream gender into their work on conflict resolution.

 

Following UNSCR 1325, subsequent Security Council Resolutions further defined the importance of women’s roles in conflict and peacebuilding. Resolutions 1820, passed in 2008, and 1888, passed in 2009,  recognize sexual violence as an issue of international peace and security and reiterate the need for a comprehensive response to sexual and gender-based violence. In 2010, Resolution 1960 created specific steps needed for the prevention of sexual violence, and Resolution 2106 in 2013 looked specifically at accountability for crimes of sexual violence. The most recent resolution on women, peace and security, UNSCR 2122, aims to strengthen measures to improve the participation of women in all phases of conflict resolution and prevention.

 

UNSCR 1325 and successive Resolutions are an important show of international support that ensure women, peace and security are on the agenda for international organizations and governments across the globe, but there are many steps between the passage of such resolutions and their full implementation on the ground.  One tool that helps bridge this gap are National Action Plans(NAPs), written plans that specify how a country will mainstream gender, and the principles of 1325 into its defense, development and diplomatic activities. Over 36 countries in the world have drafted NAPs, and that number is growing every year.

 

In addition to government- and UN-level documents and programs, it is important to consider the work women do in more informal, Track II diplomatic and peace negotiations. Around the world, women are active as civil society leaders, and in many cases, such as Liberia, Northern Ireland and the Philippines, their grassroots work has played a major role in peace processes.

 

For more resources on women, peace and security, visit The Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and SecurityPeaceWomenUSIP, and The Institute for Inclusive Security.

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