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Archive | February, 2011

Closing the Loopholes on Travelling Child Sex Offenders

Monday, February 28, 2011

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Closing the Loopholes on Travelling Child Sex Offenders

A BLOG POST BY ALICE MACEK – ECPAT UK For nearly 20 years ECPAT UK has been campaigning to end the commercial sexual exploitation of children, including the sexual exploitation of children overseas by British offenders. Almost as a negative consequence of the robust child protection frameworks in the UK, those seeking to abuse and [...]

Women on Corporate Boards

Thursday, February 24, 2011

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Women on Corporate Boards

A BLOG POST BY REBECCA LURY When the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats wrote the Coalition Agreement they agreed to ‘look to promote gender equality on the boards of listed companies’. The current situation is thus; women are under-represented on company boards in the UK. In 2010, only 12.5% of directors of FTSE 100 companies were [...]

Women of the Egyptian Revolution

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

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Women of the Egyptian Revolution

A BLOG POST BY AHMED KAMEL The Egyptian revolution of January 2011 stands as an excellent montage of a downtrodden people uniting, fighting and capturing their future peacefully. It was a popular uprising , in the truest sense, that represented all segments of the Egyptian society: poor and rich, men and women, liberals and conservatives, [...]

Mu Sochua’s Visit with Aung San Suu Kyi

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

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Mu Sochua’s Visit with Aung San Suu Kyi

A BLOG POST BY MU SOCHUA We were briefed throughouly on the political situation in Burma prior to our visit and the meeting with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. I was worried about my feelings and emotions. The invitation to Burma and to meet the woman who represent Democracy and Justice came out of nowhere. [...]

Sanctions and Burma

Monday, February 14, 2011

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Sanctions and Burma

A BLOG POST BY MU SOCHUA Daw Aung San Su Kyi wants to modify sanctions and in her own words when members of the Council of Asian Liberals and Democrats recently met her at her Rangoon residence, she says: ” I want to know how and why sanctions are hurting the Burmese people”.  Sanctions were imposed [...]

Women, Peace and Security – UN Security Council Resolution 1325

Women, Peace and Security 

 

UN Security Council Resolution 1325 was the first of its kind to specifically address the unique impact of conflict on women, and women’s important contributions to conflict resolution and sustainable peace. Passed in 2000, it marked a watershed moment when the international community formally recognized the integral role of women and gender to peace and security. UNSCR 1325 has remained an essential tool for encouraging governments to fulfill their obligations to ensure women are included as agents for peace and security in all processes, and its framework has inspired further action by the UN and civil societies and governments around the world to mainstream gender into their work on conflict resolution.

 

Following UNSCR 1325, subsequent Security Council Resolutions further defined the importance of women’s roles in conflict and peacebuilding. Resolutions 1820, passed in 2008, and 1888, passed in 2009,  recognize sexual violence as an issue of international peace and security and reiterate the need for a comprehensive response to sexual and gender-based violence. In 2010, Resolution 1960 created specific steps needed for the prevention of sexual violence, and Resolution 2106 in 2013 looked specifically at accountability for crimes of sexual violence. The most recent resolution on women, peace and security, UNSCR 2122, aims to strengthen measures to improve the participation of women in all phases of conflict resolution and prevention.

 

UNSCR 1325 and successive Resolutions are an important show of international support that ensure women, peace and security are on the agenda for international organizations and governments across the globe, but there are many steps between the passage of such resolutions and their full implementation on the ground.  One tool that helps bridge this gap are National Action Plans(NAPs), written plans that specify how a country will mainstream gender, and the principles of 1325 into its defense, development and diplomatic activities. Over 36 countries in the world have drafted NAPs, and that number is growing every year.

 

In addition to government- and UN-level documents and programs, it is important to consider the work women do in more informal, Track II diplomatic and peace negotiations. Around the world, women are active as civil society leaders, and in many cases, such as Liberia, Northern Ireland and the Philippines, their grassroots work has played a major role in peace processes.

 

For more resources on women, peace and security, visit The Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and SecurityPeaceWomenUSIP, and The Institute for Inclusive Security.

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